LAPD Conducting Investigation Of USC Doctor Accused of Sexual Misconduct

Police officials in Los Angeles report that the department is investigating a criminal complaint against a long-time gynecologist working at the University of Southern California. The accusations are that the physician has used his position to engage in inappropriate sexual misconduct for over 25 years.

 

Officials say that the investigation will reach international proportions as more than 10,000 women that were examined by George Tyndall may be interviewed.

 

Police are presently following up with 52 women who say that Tyndall, now 71 years of age, acted inappropriately while examining them. Justin Eisenberg, Deputy Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department says that the alleged acts took place between the years 1990 to 2016.

 

The police department will work in conjunction with the California Medical Board and any documented wrongdoing on the part of Tyndall will be referred to prosecutors.

 

Tyndall has not made himself available for comment but has denied any wrongdoings and has said the allegations against him are incorrect. While speaking to the Los Angeles Times, Tyndall said that each exam he conducted was done so by following standard procedure and done with total professionalism.

 

The university has admitted that it did not respond in accordance with school policy in eight allegations made against Tyndall between the years 2000 to 2014. A handful of former patients of Tyndall at the university have filed lawsuits and one sworn statement detailed an event that was said to have occurred in 1991.

 

C.L Max Nikias has faced the brunt of the blame for the incident and a week ago 200 faculty members called for his ousting. An additional 2,200 students, alumni, and other supporters of the university signed a petition for Nikias’ dismissal online. The pressure resulted in Nikias relinquishing his post over the past weekend.

 

The problems began for Tyndall at the university when reports surfaced that he had performed examinations that were not considered to be up to par in regards to accepted medical standards. It was also said that Tyndall had harassed former patients. Tyndall resigned shortly afterward and the university established a hotline to field calls from the community and allow others with accusations to step forward. Media has reported that 400 complaints have been voiced via the hotline.

 

LAPD says that it is not yet clear if criminal charges will be filed against Tyndall.