Category Archives: California Fault Line

Scientists Discover New Type of Earthquake

Scientists working at Caltech in Pasadena, California, say that earthquakes may not be limited to the earth’s crust, according to an article recently published on Science Alert. They now believe that earthquakes can occur in the earth’s upper mantle.

So far, the team has just discovered smaller earthquakes in the crust, but there is disagreement over how strong these earthquakes that are undetectable using traditional seismic equipment may become. Some scientists believe that earthquakes occurring in the earth’s mantle will remain less than a 2 calling them localized chatter that cannot group themselves together to form a massive earthquake. Others suggest that they may become stronger than any earthquake that has happened so far.

Researchers started looking at this phenomena after a 8.6 earthquake occurred in the Indian Ocean on April 12, 2016. This earthquake did not occur in line with traditional theories. Therefore, scientists had to start looking for a new hypothesis. The earthquake did, however, occur along a fault line similar to those found in the San Andes fault line and the Newport-Inglewood fault lines.

Meanwhile, scientists with the Southern California Earthquake Center said at the National Earthquake Conference that they believe that a major earthquake may occur along the San Andes fault very soon. The Pacific plate is moving northwest at a rate of 16 feet every 100 years while the North America plate is not moving. Therefore, tension is being created under California. If a major earthquake occurs in this area, then scientists say that it could kill 1,800 people, injure over 50,000, cause $200 billion in property damage and cause six months of compromised sewer system problems. They are most worried about the damage spreading towards Los Angeles, although they say damage in the Coachella Valley, Island Empire and Antelope Valley would be extensive.

Scientists have also announced that they have found a new fault line under the Salton Sea. They believe that this fault line may be taking pressure off the San Andreas fault which is why major quakes have not recently occurred there. This new fault line has recently been rumbling producing 300 small earthquakes last week.

New California Fault Line Discovered

Researchers in California have recently found a new fault line that runs mainly under the Salton Sea, according to an article recently published on Wire. The fault line was discovered while a team of scientist was mapping the sea’s floor for other purposes using equipment that has just recently been developed.

Researchers at the Southern California Earthquake Center say that this fault line may be taking pressure off the San Andreas fault line and the Imperial fault line. If so, then this may explain why the promised big earthquake has not developed.

They say that the earth’s crust is covered with a series of small fault lines. Most of these lines go unmapped because of the expenses incurred in locating them and in mapping them. They say that they had long suspected that there was a fault line running between the San Andreas fault line and the Imperial fault line because the end of the two lines do not meet as they would expect.

The new fault line, called the Salton Trough Fault, has been sending off little earthquakes lately. Scientists measured 300 on one night recently that were under a 2 magnitude. Therefore, they increased the likelihood that a big earthquake would soon develop.

Officials with the National Earthquake Center say that the earth is constantly in motion. They know that the Pacific plate of the San Andreas fault is moving northwest about 16 feet per 100 years. They also know that the North American plate has not moved in recent years. Therefore, they believed that a major earthquake in California would occur soon. Now, with this discovery, they are rethinking their theories.

Scientists have recently determined that earthquakes can occur much deeper than they previously thought. They say that the new evidence suggests that earthquakes can start up to 15 miles below the earth’s crust. Since the depth of the new fault has yet to be determined, it is feasible that the Salton Trough Fault connects to the San Andreas Fault deep under the earth’s crust. Therefore, scientists say that they need more time to update their thinking and earthquake models.

 

A Magnitude-6.5 Earthquake Off Coast of Northern California

On the morning of Thursday, December 8, 2016, around 6:50 a.m. PT., the U.S. Geological Survey reported that a 6.5 earthquake had struck at a depth of about 7.5 miles on the Pacific Ocean floor off the West Coast at the north end of the San Andreas Fault.

 

The quake was centered approximately 279 miles west northwest of Sacramento and 102 miles west of Ferndale. Light shaking was felt from several dozen miles south of San Francisco to east central Oregon. This quake was followed by a 4.7 magnitude temblor/aftershock at 8:32 a.m.

 

However, the earthquake did not disturb even one bulb on Ferndale’s tallest living lit Christmas tree in the nation, a giant Sitka spruce decorated with strings of 900 to 1,000 colored lights. The tree is an annual holiday tradition since 1934 in this quaint Victorian village.

 

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center stated that no tsunami threat was expected from the initial earthquake, and there had been no reports of injuries or major damage. There was some inconvenience for commuters in the San Francisco Bay Area because BART trains moved at a temporarily reduced speed in the temblor’s aftermath, but that only led to delays of about 10 minutes.

 

CEO of the California Earthquake Authority, Glenn Pomeroy, stated that if a 6.5 quake had occurred on a Bay Area or Los Angeles fault, there could have been billions in property damage and injuries or even deaths.

 

California’s north coast is among the most seismically active areas and had experienced smaller temblors in the days before the magnitude-6.5 one. The offshore area had experienced a magnitude-6.9 temblor in March 2014 and two earthquakes with magnitudes over 5.0 weeks apart in January 2015.

 

The Pacific Coast or West Coast is the description of the coastline where the Western United States meets the northern Pacific Ocean. It refers to the area defined on the east by the Cascade Range, Mojave Desert, and Sierra Nevada and on the west by the Pacific Ocean. The U.S. Census calls the five states of California, Washington, Oregon, Alaska, and Hawaii the Pacific States division. However, the Pacific or West Coast of the contiguous U.S. in this case would be just the first three states.

 

New California Fault Line Discovered

Researchers in California have recently found a new fault line that runs mainly under the Salton Sea, according to an article recently published on Wire. The fault line was discovered while a team of scientist was mapping the sea’s floor for other purposes using equipment that has just recently been developed.

Researchers at the Southern California Earthquake Center say that this fault line may be taking pressure off the San Andreas fault line and the Imperial fault line. If so, then this may explain why the promised big earthquake has not developed.

They say that the earth’s crust is covered with a series of small fault lines. Most of these lines go unmapped because of the expenses incurred in locating them and in mapping them. They say that they had long suspected that there was a fault line running between the San Andreas fault line and the Imperial fault line because the end of the two lines do not meet as they would expect.

The new fault line, called the Salton Trough Fault, has been sending off little earthquakes lately. Scientists measured 300 on one night recently that were under a 2 magnitude. Therefore, they increased the likelihood that a big earthquake would soon develop.

Officials with the National Earthquake Center say that the earth is constantly in motion. They know that the Pacific plate of the San Andreas fault is moving northwest about 16 feet per 100 years. They also know that the North American plate has not moved in recent years. Therefore, they believed that a major earthquake in California would occur soon. Now, with this discovery, they are rethinking their theories.

Scientists have recently determined that earthquakes can occur much deeper than they previously thought. They say that the new evidence suggests that earthquakes can start up to 15 miles below the earth’s crust. Since the depth of the new fault has yet to be determined, it is feasible that the Salton Trough Fault connects to the San Andreas Fault deep under the earth’s crust. Therefore, scientists say that they need more time to update their thinking and earthquake models.